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SEND Specialist Advice and Support (SEND SAS)

Last updated on 24 January 2022

SEND Specialist Advice and Support (SEND SAS) is part of Integrated Services for Learning in Children’s Services. We work throughout Hertfordshire to support children and young people (0-25) with special educational needs and disabilities, their families and schools or settings.

Our team of specialist advisory teachers have additional qualifications and/or expertise in their field and are supported by a team of skilled in their area practitioners.  Specialist advisory teachers support the following areas of special educational needs and disabilities: 

  • sensory impairment (visual, hearing and deafblind),
  • physical and neurological impairment,
  • speech, language and communication needs,
  • specific learning difficulties. 

Our Early Years practitioners also provide support to children with a diagnosed condition, such as Down Syndrome and children with Global Development Delay.            

SEND SAS provides specialist advice, guidance, modelling of strategies and interventions.  We also provide a range of training to support the development of classroom strategies and targeted intervention to ensure children and young people have access to learning within their school/setting.  Our offer of support includes advice about enabling environments for children and young people with a sensory and/or physical disability to ensure their access and inclusion.        

In addition to home visits for our babies and toddlers, we provide specialist groups to support our Early Years children and their parents/carers.  The groups are for children with a sensory and/or physical disability, speech and language and communication needs and/or difficulties with cognition and learning.

In addition to this offer, we have a strong commitment to supporting the wider work of Hertfordshire County Council’s strategic developments, including Local Partnership working with stakeholders to improve outcomes for our children and young people.  

First published 11 September 2020 - Last updated on 24 January 2022